British Grand Prix Aero Analysis

F1 came back to its home in England with a great race taken place at Silverstone. Most teams have made noticeable upgrades on their cars, although tyre issue caught all the attention by the end of the day. Pirelli states that “a series of different causes led to the failures, including rear tyres mounted the wrong way around, low tyre pressures, extreme camber angles and high kerbs”. Although they could blame a combination of various causes, it’s really the time for them to take a serious look at those tyres they made.

In aerodynamics perspective, Lotus brought out the DRD systems that they’ve been developing since last year, Ferrari modified both their front and rear wing, and Red Bull made some change to their diffuser.

Lotus DRD
I have written about the DRD on Lotus E20 last year – Lotus E20 Drag Reduction Device. DRD is basically a passive air switch that operates by air velocity. Several teams have tried out this device including Red Bull, Mercedes and Sauber. However Lotus was the only one who insisted and has a possibly €12.5m budget on it. Lotus E21 is designed with DRD inlets, however it was mostly closed during the season. In Silverstone, DRD was put on Raikkonen’s car while kept closed on Grosjean’s car. Lotus have also made different modifications to the car body based on DRD.

Lotus E21 without DRD
Lotus E21 without DRD
Lotus E21 with DRD
Lotus E21 with DRD

There is an obvious periscope shape outlet on Kimi’s car with DRD fitted. Romain’s car however, without DRD, features a slimmer body with shark fin on it. And correspondingly a slimmer monkey seat was used on Romain’s car. The slimmer bodywork may improve the performance of diffuser and rear wing without DRD.

Lotus E21 Monkey Seat Variation with/without DRD
Lotus E21 Monkey Seat Variation with/without DRD

The different setup on two cars would enable Lotus to carry out direct comparison between the package with DRD and a whole new package without DRD. And hopefully they’ve got some valuable data from Silverstone so that we can see more of their development on the drag reduction device.

Ferrari’s Front and Rear Wing

Ferrari added a new cascade (green arrow below) on their front wing, which improves the airflow rearward by directing more air over the suspension into the sidepod.

Ferrari's Front WIng at Silverstone
Ferrari’s Front Wing at Silverstone

At the rear end, they added a vertical slot on the side of the rear wing endplate. This could potentially help dealing with the wake come off the rear wheel.

Ferrari's Rear Wing at Silverstone
Ferrari’s Rear Wing at Silverstone

Red Bull

Red Bull modified their diffuser with some additional slotted strakes to seek for more downforce.

Red Bull Diffuser at Silverstone
Red Bull Diffuser at Silverstone

Force India

Another obvious update is from Force India, who added some vortex generators on the front wing as Red Bull did in Canada. They would create more guidance to the air and re-energise the flow to make it better attached to the surface.

Force India - Small vortex generators on the wing
Force India – Small vortex generators on the wing

*Pictures from AMuS

Advertisements

SingaporeGP Tech Updates

After going through two low downforce cicuits Monza and Spa, F1 came to Singapore, a narrow street circuit requiring high downforce. Correspondingly, most teams brought new setup for this track, while some of them gives a speed boost, others don’t seem to benefit anything. Successful examples are Red bull’s new break ducts and Mercedes Coanda effect exhausts. However Ferrari, using Alonso’s word, had a development error again, while Lotus expierenced a lack of grip throughout the weekend.

Mercedes

They’ve finally joined the group of ‘Coanda’ Exhaust after it was introduced by McLaren early season and used by Ferrari, Sauber, etc. The new exhaust utilise sidepod bulges to improve airflow passing through the sides of the car to the floor. Coanda effect basically describe the tendency of fluid attaching to the nearby surface. The bulge would help bending the flow at exhaust area down to the diffuser, therefore seal and speed up the airflow to create a low pressure area underneath the car. This effect increases downforce at the rear and gives advantage at low speed corners – that’s why it’s preferred in Singapore.

Mercedes Coanda Exhaust

Red Bull

The narrow street circuit indicates huge pressure on the brakes and cooling system. Red Bull came with new brake discs and ducts made of CER, a new material whose wear resistance feature is about 4 times better than the old CCR.

Source: F1 Official Site

Red Bull Singapore Front Brake Duct Detail

They’ve also modified their front wing with slots in the front of wheel area to reduce wake behind and seperate flaps to decrease drag induced by the high downforce setup.

Red Bull Singapore Front WIng

Williams

Williams was in quite good pace in Singapore actually with Maldonaldo hitting 2nd in qualifying, although hydraulic problem for Maldonaldo and KERS problem for Senna leave both drivers nothing in this race. They’ve introduced a much more rounded nosecone with centre bulge in this race, quite similar to the Lotus one.

Source: F1 Technical

Williams Singapore Nosecone

Ferrari

They brought two sets of wings into Singapore with the new one having more louvres on the endplates and deeper cuts on the top flap. There’s also 8 gills added to the side of the diffuser, wishing to generate more downforce. However, testing result on Friday was rather frustrating so that the team decided to use the oler version for Singapore race. This happened quite a few time throughout the season, which makes Alonso quite worried – Ferrari focused on understanding ‘development errors’

Source: F1 Official Site

Ferrari Singapore Rear Wing – Not Used

McLaren

They’ve modified their rear wing for Singapore and here is a nice flow viz picture of it.

McLaren Singapore Rear WIng Flow VIz

Monza Low Downforce Setup

There is no circuit in F1 that looks simpler than Monza, a typical circuit dominated by long straights. In response to this, downforce is not that favourable here, on the contrary, low downforce setup aiming to reduce drag is the key to win the race.

Front Wing

Front wing is not often changed significantly from race to race as it is the part that determines downstream flow, therefore affecting the design of all following parts. However, for Monza, most teams have adjust their front wing by removing cascades, lower down AoA or reducing chord length.

McLaren has removed all the outer cascades and replaced their 2-section upper flap with one single upper flap.

Source: Formula1.com

McLaren Front Wing Change from Spa to Monza

Source: Sutton Image

McLaren Front Wing in Monza

Another noticeable change on front wing is from Ferrari, who has removed all the small upper cascades and made several changes to the flaps and endplates profile.

Source: Formula1.com

Ferrari Front Wing Comparison from Spa to Monza

Rear Wing

The rear wing design is closely related to exhaust/cooling, sidepod and rear diffuser. Teams have different adjustments based on their cars. Major methods to reduce downforce/drag in Monza includes slimming rear wings, introducing V-shape profile and use gurney flap on diffusers.

With Massa hitting 3rd in qualifying and Alonso finishing on podium from 10th start, Ferrari proved their speed in Monza. They modified the beam wing with a V-cut profile and slimmed outer span, fit gurneys along the trailing edge of the diffuser, and quite uniquely, added flaps above and below the diffuser. The V-cut supplies the car with enough downforce at corners with low downforce setup for straights. Use of gurneys and additional flaps help regulating the flow, correspondingly reducing drag.

farrari monza rear design
Source: ScarbsF1

Ferrari Rear Design for Monza

Similar to Ferrari, Red Bull also used a V-shaped beam wing, in combination with a rear wing of very small AoA. They’re among the teams that suffer the most from the ban of exhaust blown diffuser this year and quite obviously still haven’t found a ideal design for their underbody rear part. In Monza, they’ve also added an additional tier to the diffuser gurneys, though that didn’t seem to give them clear benefit.

Red Bull V-shaped Beam Wing

Source: Sutton Image

Additional Tier on RB8 Diffuser Gurney

As the low downforce rear wing has clearly given Button huge advantage in Spa, McLaren is quite happy using this setup for both cars in Monza with a few modifications to further reduce drag. Instead of slimming the wing as other teams, McLaren cleverly introduced a curved profile at the tip of their beam wing to smooth air flow.

Source: ScarbsF1

McLaren Rear Design for Monza – Note Curved Tips on Beam Wing

Lotus has drawn wide attention because of their so-called DDRS system – It’s still quite confusing how people call this device though. Anyway we’re not seeing it until Singapore since Monza is not a preferable circuit for this system. In Monza, Lotus runs on the shortest chord rear wing, which makes it look quite tiny from behind.

Source: F1 Technical

Lotus Rear Design for Monza

Check this post from ScrabsF1 for more detailed analysis of rear end design based on each car relating exhaust/cooling/sidepod to rear wing assembly.